Loading

German Aircraft in Service 1933-1945

GERMAN AIRCRAFT - AN OVERVIEW

by Mitch on April 15, 2010 1 Comment

German aircraft designs were consistently among the most advanced and successful of the war. Of all the nations, Germany was the first to begin to make significant use of jet aircraft, although these nevertheless came too late in the war and in insufficient quantity to have a decisive effect on the course of the air war. The Luftwaffe (German air force) had a few advocates for the production of large four-engine bombers, most notably the prewar chief of staff general Walther Wever. However, with his death in April 1936, the idea of a strategic role for the Luftwaffe also died, and the German air force instead adopted the basic doctrine that bombers should be used tactically to support the ground troops directly by striking targets on or near the battlefield. By the time the war began, German bombers were used strategically to bomb civilian targets, especially London and other English cities during the Battle of Britain. However, because of prevailing Luftwaffe doctrine, Germany, unlike the United States and Great Britain, produced no significant four-engine bombers. Abortive plans were made for the “Amerika” bomber, a spectacular aircraft of intercontinental range, but nothing came of the project.

 

The Stuka. Perhaps the most infamous of Germany’s bombers was the single-engine Junkers Ju87, better known as the Stuka. Designed in the mid-1930s, the Stuka was a dive bomber, which deployed its 1,100-pound bomb load not from level flight but from low altitude, near the end of a sharp 80-degree dive. This ensured surgical accuracy of the strike. By 1942, it was even fitted with a single 4000-pound bomb, which was used against heavy tanks. After striking its target with bombs, the Stuka often circled around to strafe survivors with its three 7.9-mm machine guns. The aircraft was also fitted with sirens, so-called Jericho trumpets, which produced a truly terrifying scream during the high-speed dive. Thus, the weapon produced as much panic and terror as physical destruction.

 

Stukas were deployed with great effect in the invasion of Poland, the Battle of France, and the invasion of the Soviet Union. However, after these early operations, the 238-mile-per-hour, poorly maneuverable Stuka proved increasingly vulnerable to fighter attack and was reconfigured in 1942 as the Ju87G-1, a dedicated antitank aircraft.

 

The Ju87B-2, best known of the Stuka iterations, was powered by a single 1,200-horsepower Jumo 211 Da engine and had a wingspan of 45 feet 3 1/3 inches, a service ceiling of 26,250 feet, and a range of 490 miles. It could be configured to carry a maximum of four individual bombs. About 5,700 Stukas were completed before production ended in 1944.

 

Germany’s other significant bombers were twin-engine medium bombers and included the following.

 

Heinkel He111H-3. Crewed by four or five, the Heinkel first flew in early 1939. It was powered by two Junkers Jumo 211D-2 V-12 engines, each making 1,200 horsepower for a top speed, empty, of 258 miles per hour. Range was 745 miles and service ceiling 25,590 feet. The plane’s wingspan was 74 feet 1 3/4 inches. It was heavily armed with 7.92-mm machine guns in the nose cap, in the dorsal position, in a ventral gondola, in waist windows, in a fixed forward-firing position, in the side of the nose (could be operated by the copilot), and in the tail. The plane also had a 20-mm cannon on a fixed mount in the front part of the ventral gondola. Bomb load was up to 4,410 pounds.

 

Dornier Do 17Z-1. Crewed by four, the Do17Z- 1 was introduced in January 1939 and was driven by a pair of Bramo Fafnir 323P 9-cylinder radial engines making 1,000 horsepower each. Wingspan was 59 feet, top speed 263 miles per hour, and service ceiling 26,740 feet. Range was 721 miles. The aircraft was armed with three 7.92-mm machine guns, one manually aimed from a rear ventral hatch, one manually aimed to the rear from a dorsal position, and one fixed forward in the right windshield. The bomber could carry a 2,205- pound load internally. About 1,100 Dorniers (all versions) were produced before the type was phased out in 1942, having taken very heavy casualties in the Battle of Britain.

 

Junkers Ju88A-4. A very successful design, 14,676 were built in all versions. About 9,000 were configured as medium bombers. The rest were configured mostly as night fighters. The versatile aircraft was used throughout the war, beginning with operations in Poland in 1939 and against just about every enemy Germany fought. The Ju88A4 version was capable of operating as a level bomber, a dive bomber, and a torpedo bomber. Generally, the bomb load consisted of 10 50-pound bombs loaded internally with as many as four bombs of various types fixed to hard points under the wings. A pair of torpedoes could also be mounted under the wings. Wingspan was 65 feet 10 inches, and the plane was driven by a pair of 950-horsepower Junkers Jumo 211 F engines. Top speed was 292 miles per hour, ceiling 26,900 feet, and range 1,106 miles.

 

Dornier Do 217K/M. The Do 217 series of bombers became operational in March 1941 and represented a significant advance over the Do 17. In addition to serving as a level bomber, the Do 217 could be configured as a night fighter, a torpedo bomber, and a reconnaissance aircraft. By August 1943, the aircraft was also being used to carry anti-shipping missiles, and by September, it was delivering guided bombs against warships. Production reached 1,905 of all types, including some 1,366 level bombers. The Do 217K and M versions were crewed by four and powered by two 1,700-horsepower BMW 810D 14-cylinder radials (K) or two 1,750-horsepower Daimler-Benz DB603A inverted V12s (M). Top speed was 320 miles per hour, service ceiling 24,600 feet, and range 1,430 miles. Wingspan was 62 feet 4 inches, and, for the M version, armament consisted of four 7.92-mm and two 13-mm machine guns with a bomb load of 8,818 pounds; the K version added two underwing FX-1400 Fritz X radio-controlled bombs, two FX-1400 bombs, or two Hs 293 missiles.

 

Junkers Ju188E-1. Produced in reconnaissance (designated D) and bomber versions (designated E), the Ju188 series was crewed by five and first flew in 1940. About 1,100 were produced during the war. The Ju 188E was powered by two BMW 801G- 2 18-cylinder two-row radials, each producing 1,700 horsepower for a top speed of 310 miles per hour. Service ceiling was 31,510 feet, and range was 1,211 miles. Wingspan was 72 feet 2 inches. Typically, the aircraft was armed with a single 20-mm cannon in its nose and three 13-mm machine guns, one in a dorsal turret, one manually aimed from the rear dorsal position, and one manually aimed from the rear ventral position; in some configurations, twin 7.92-mm machine guns were substituted for the last position. Typical bomb load was 6,614 pounds loaded internally, or two 2,200- pound torpedoes under the wings.

 

Heinkel He177A-5. This was the largest bomber Germany actually deployed, with a wingspan of 103 feet 1 3/4 inches and a bomb load capacity of 13,228 pounds. It was powered by two massive 3,100-horsepower Daimler-Benz DB610 coupled engines. This design feature was an innovative attempt to reduce drag, but it created severe reliability problems that often resulted in engine fires. Fully three-quarters of the preproduction prototypes crashed; 1,146 were produced, and while the 3,100-mile range was badly needed by the Luftwaffe, the airplanes were not very effective as strategic bombers. They were used with moderate effectiveness in an antitank role. Top speed was 295 miles per hour and service ceiling 26,500 feet. Armament consisted of one 7.92-mm machine gun manually aimed in the nose, one 20-mm machine gun manually aimed in the forward ventral gondola, two 13-mm machine guns in a front dorsal turret, one in the aft dorsal turret, and one 20-mm cannon in the tail position.

 

Arado Ar234B-2. Of greater historical than practical significance was the Arado Ar234B-2, the world’s first jet bomber, which became operational at the end of November 1944, too late to have any impact on the course of the war. Powered by a pair of BMW 003A-1 jets, each developing 1,764 pounds of thrust, the Arado had a top speed of 461 miles per hour and could carry 4,409 pounds of bombs over a 1,000-mile range. Service ceiling was 32,810 feet. For defensive purposes, the Arado carried two 20-mm cannon. Only 210 were built.

 

German fighter designs were generally more successful and more innovative than its bomber designs. The two most important fighters were the Messerschmitt 109 series and the Focke-Wulf 190 series.

 

Messerschmitt 109. The Messerschmitt 109 first flew in October 1935, powered by British Rolls- Royce Kestrel engines. The aircraft entered Luftwaffe service in spring 1937 and received its baptism of fire in the Spanish civil war. By the beginning of World War II, the aircraft existed in a number of variants, and 1,000 were deployed against Poland in September 1939. The 109 was superior to most other fighters at the outbreak of the war but was fairly evenly matched with the British Spitfire and Hurricane in the Battle of Britain. It did have one very significant advantage over these rivals, however. Its fuel injection system allowed for a constant fuel flow even in negative-g conditions, which meant that a pilot could dive or shear away much more quickly than his opponents. This added significantly to the plane’s survivability. Counterbalancing this advantage, however, was the 109’s limited range—a 300-mile operating radius for the 109G. This gave the fighter precious little combat time over relatively remote targets such as those in England.

 

Some 109 variants had a cannon placed in the hollowed-out nose cap. In early models, this created an unacceptable level of vibration, which, however, was eliminated in later versions. Additionally, most of the fighters were fitted with two wing-mounted cannons and two machine guns mounted on the top of the nose cone that were synchronized to fire through the propeller arc. The 109G, introduced in 1942, was powered by a Daimler- Benz DB605 1,475-horsepower engine to a top speed of 387 miles per hour at 23,000 feet. Wingspan was 32 feet 6 1/2 inches. The backbone of the Luftwaffe, some 30,000 109s were built before the end of the war.

 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190. Superior even to the formidable Messerschmitt 109 was the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, which made its first flight on June 1, 1939. It first saw action in the Battle of France in September 1941 and was markedly superior to the British Spitfire. Most Fw 190s were the A series, powered by a single BMW 801 2,100-horsepower radial engine. However, late in 1943, the D was deployed against U.S. bombers, powered by the Jumo 213 inline, liquid-cooled engine, which developed only 1,770 horsepower but had improved performance, producing a top speed of 426 miles per hour, 18 miles per hour faster than the A version. In all, some 20,000 Fw 190s of all types were built before the end of the war. Wingspan of the D type was 34 feet 5 1/3 inches, and armament consisted of two 20-mm wing-mounted cannon and two 13-mm machine guns in the nose. Range was 520 miles and service ceiling 40,000 feet.

 

Messerschmitt Bf 110. The twin-engine Messerschmitt Bf 110 made its first flight in May 1936. With all-metal construction and a crew of three, the aircraft was powered by two Daimler Benz DB 601 engines, each making 1,100 horsepower and propelling the plane to a maximum speed of 336 miles per hour over a range of 680 miles. Wingspan was 53 feet 4 inches, and armament consisted of five machine guns and two 20-mm cannon. Formidable as all this seems, the aircraft performed poorly in the Battle of Britain. This prompted a redesign with the inclusion of radar, which transformed the Bf 110 into the Luftwaffe’s finest night fighter. In all, nearly 6,000 Bf 110s were produced before the end of the war.

 

Jet and rocket-propelled fighters. Late in the war, in 1944, Germany introduced both jet- and rocket-propelled fighters. The Messerschmitt 163B was powered by a single Walter rocket motor developing 3,700 pounds of thrust and capable of reaching 590 miles per hour at 20,000 feet. Range, however, was extremely limited. Armed with two 30-mm cannon and 24 R4M rockets, the 163B had a wingspan of 30 feet 7 inches. Very few were produced. More significant, however, was the jet-powered Messerschmitt 262A, with two Junkers 004 jets, each making 1,980 pounds of thrust, mounted under the wings. Top speed was 540 miles per hour over a range of 420 miles. Armament was limited to four 30-mm cannon. The aircraft was designed primarily to attack Allied bombers, which it did very effectively. Had the aircraft been introduced earlier and in much greater numbers, its impact on the air war over Europe would have been profound.

 

Further reading: Brown, Eric. Wings of the Luftwaffe: Flying German Aircraft of the Second World War. Shrewsbury, U.K.: Airlife, 2001; Donald, David, ed. German Aircraft of World War II. Minneapolis: Motorbooks International, 1996; Griehl, Manfred. German Jets of World War II. London: Arms & Armour, 1989; Gunston, Bill. An Illustrated Guide to German, Italian and Japanese Fighters of World War II: Major Fighters and Attack Aircraft of the Axis Powers. London: Salamander Books, 1980; Gunston, Bill. World War II German Aircraft. London: Book Sales, 1985; Kay, Antony L., and J. R. Smith. German Aircraft of the Second World War. Annapolis, Md.: United States Naval Institute, 2002; Shepherd, Christopher. German Aircraft of World War II. London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1975.

Page 1 of 1.

The Fw 190F-8

by Mitch on March 15, 2013 0 Comments

The Focke-Wulf Fw.19 F-8 was the most mass-produced variant of the Fw.190F series, based on the Fw.190A-8. By March 1944, Fw 190F-8s were also produced by the Arado Company in Warnemuende, and by April the NDW Company in Wismar. The aircraft was powered by the BMW 801 D-2 engine with improved injector on the compressor, which provided emergency power for up to 10-15 minutes at 1,000 meters of altitude. Otherwise the plane’s equipment was largely similar to the A-8, although the FuG 16 ZY radio was replaced with the FuG 16 ZS in April 1944. This allowed for direct communication with ground troops on the battlefield. A distinctive characteristic of the F-8 was a widened rear canopy. The new canopy was introduced in the latter half of 1944. It improved forward and downward visibility, which was very important for ground attack. On-board armament consisted of twin MG 131 machine guns in the fuselage and two MG 151/20E cannon in the wings.

 

 

 

In the spring of 1944 the F-8 model replaced F-3 on assembly lines.The base for the plane was A-8 armed with two MG131MGs in fuselage and MG151/20E in wings. It was quite short series and then the new model F-8/R1 was intruduced. Its armament was extended with underwing ETC50 (later with ETC70 or ETC71 ) bomb racks.In addition the new bulged cockpit conopy was introduced.

 

Here a few variants of the F-8 assault Wurger with Umrustbausatz kits and Rustsatz kit standards,

 

Fw190F-8 (basic plane) 2xMG151 in wing roots

 

Fw 190F-8/U1 - long range fighter-bomber (provided as replacement for the Fw 190G-8 by then withdrawn from production). The plane had underwing pylons installed from the Bf 110 V.Mitt-Schloss (Verkleidetes Messerschmitt Schloss) for mounting two 300 litre fuel tanks and additional fuel pumps inside the wings. Some planes had ETC 503 bomb racks in place of the pylons that gave the capability of carrying two additional 250 kg bombs (in this case the fuel tank was mounted under the fuselage) on ETC 501 racks. It was possible was to mount bombs on all points (2x250 kg and 1x500 kg), this reduced range but made the Fw 190A dangerous plane carrying 1000 kg of bombs.

 

Fw 190F-8/U2 - torpedo plane with two underwing ETC 503 racks or under-fuselage mounted ETC 504 (previously ETC 501) bomb rack. The plane was equipped with a special sight system, TSA 2A (Tiefsturzangle 2A) for precise aerial torpedo BT (Bombentorpedo) aiming. Using this torpedo it was possible to attack targets from a higher altitude and from a higher angle than in the case of an ordinary aerial torpedo LT (Lufttorpedo). It was planned to use two BT 400 or one BT 700 torpedo. Other armament was reduced to two fuselage mounted MG 131 machine guns. A small number of these planes were in service with 11./KG200.

 

Fw 190F-8/U3 - torpedo plane adapted for transportation of the heavy BT 1400 torpedo on an under-fuselage mounted ETC 502 pylon designed especially for this in TWP Gotenhafen-Hexengrund (see the section "Operational use"). His plane had a lengthened tail wheel strut to eliminate the possibility of striking the ground with the torpedo. The plane was equipped with the TSA 2 sight system coupled with a FuG 101 radio altimeter. This version was powered by the more powerful 2000 hp (1470 kW) BMW 801 TS engine. The Ta 152 tail was also mounted.

 

Fw 190F-8/U4 - night fighter-bomber powered by a BMW 801 TS engine with exhaust flames dampers. Standard equipment was: PKS 12 autopilot device, FuG 101 radio altimeter, TSA 2A sight system and other devices to aid night navigation and flight. Armament consisted of aerial torpedoes and bombs that could be carried on two underwing ETC 503 bomb racks. Other armament was reduced to two MG 151/20 E cannons in wings. Probably only one plane built (W.Nr. 586596). Admittedly, NSGr 20 used numerous Fw 190F-8 with flame dumpers and underwing mounted bomb racks but it was not a F-8/U4 but rather field adapted, standard G-8 or F-8/U1 planes.

 

Fw 190F-8/U5 - simplified variant of F-8/U2 modification, without some of the external equipment.

 

Fw 190F-8/R1 - fighter-bomber with four underwing mounted ETC 50 bomb racks for 50 kg bombs, later replaced by ETC 71 dispensers for 70 kg bombs (e.g. AB 70 cluster bomb). There are planes known with both dispenser types mounted in pairs of the different types (2x ETC 50 + 2x ETC 71) under the wings.

 

Fw 190F-8/R3 - attack plane with two MK 103 30 mm cannons, similar to the A-5/U11 variant. Only two planes built.

 

Fw 190F-8/R13 - plane adapted for night operations, equivalent to the F8/U4.

 

Fw 190F-8/R14 - torpedo plane adapted to carry aerial torpedoes LT F 5b and LT 1B on the ETC 502 bomb rack. It was a development of Fw 190 A-5/U14 plane. It was equipped with the lengthened tail wheel strut and enlarged Ta 152 tail. Powered by the more powerful BMW 801 TS engine.

 

Fw 190F-8/R15 - equivalent to F-8/U3.

 

Fw 190F-8/R16 - equivalent to F-8/U2.

 

Fw190F-8/Pb1 - Panzerblitz 1 (Pb 1) system was developed consisting of six and, more often, eight R4M air-to-air missiles. They were adapted for tank destroying by mounting an 80 mm M8 type warhead for an armour penetration of up to 90 mm. Using the Pb 1 unit it was possible to destroy tanks at a 200 m distance with rockets being fired in salvo or in pairs. The only limitation was a maximum speed of 490 km/hr, not to be exceeded during missile firing. Up to February 1945 the Luftwaffe received 115 Fw 190F-8/Pb 1 planes.

 

 

Fw190F-8/Pb2 - Panzerblitz 2 (Pb 2) unit( the successor to the Pb 1 unit). The main difference between them was the replacement of the M8 warhead by a hollow-charge warhead able to penetrate up to 180 mm armour. Also developed was the new missile system Panzerblitz 3 (Pb 3) with a 210 mm hollow-charge warhead, but it was not operational by the end of the war.

 

 

LINK

Focke-Wulf Ta 154 Moskito

by Mitch on September 12, 2012 0 Comments

The Focke-Wulf Ta 154 Moskito was a fast night fighter designed by Kurt Tank and produced by Focke-Wulf late in World War II. A competitor to the Heinkel He 219, the Focke- Wulf Ta 154 was intended as the Luftwaffe’s response to the British De Havilland Mosquito, and came near to becoming a major combat Luftwaffe airplane. The first prototype, V1, fitted with two Jumo 211F engines, flew on July 1, 1943. The first armed version of the Ta 154 with Lichtenstein radar was the V3, which also was the first to fit the Jumo 211R engines. By June 1944, the Jumo 213 engine was finally arriving in some numbers, and a small batch of Ta 154A-1 craft were completed with these engines. The Ta 154 had a crew of two, a length of 12.55 m (40 ft 3 in), a wing-span of 16.30 m (52 ft 5 in), a height of 3.60 m (11 ft 4 in), a wing area of 31.40 square m (333.68 square ft), and an empty weight of 6,600 kg (14,550 lbs). It had a maximum speed of 615 km/h (404 mph), a range of 1,400 km (872 miles), and a service ceiling of 9,500 m (31,200 ft). The landing-gear was a tricycle arrangement with steerable nose wheel. Armament included two 20-mm MG 151 cannons, two 30-mm MG 131 nose-mounted cannons, and a MG 131 Schräge Musik cannon firing upward at a 60-degree angle. By August 1944, about fifty production versions had been completed, but the aircraft never made it, mostly because a glue of bad quality was used which ate away the wooden parts. Like the British De Havilland Mosquito, the German Focke-Wulf Ta 154 Moskito was made of wood. This led to some of the production versions breaking up in mid-air, as the glue was incapable of withstanding the stresses produced in flight. The inability to find an adequate adhesive prevented completion of an order for 250 planes. Some of the planes produced served with Nachtjagdgeschwader 3 (Night Fighter Group 3), a few were later used as a training aircraft for jet pilots, and some were modified to form the bottom half of Mistel composite aircraft.

Blohm & Voss Bv 144

by Mitch on September 7, 2012 0 Comments

A fast passenger plane, the Bv 144 was designed as a successor to the Junkers Ju 52/3m as transport aircraft. The project started in 1940 and was reworked in winter 1940-41. Two prototypes were built. Because of the war situation, the design work was made mostly by French engineers in Hamburg. Two aircraft were made in France by the Louis Breguet Aircraft Company at Anglet near Bayonne. The first machine made its first flight in August 1944, but due to the liberation of France by the Allies in the summer of 1944, all testing was cancelled. Despite the advanced design, both prototype airliners were scrapped after the German withdrawal. The Bv 144 would have had a crew of three and a capacity of eighteen passengers. It was powered by two 1,600-hp BMW 801MA 18-cylinder two-row radial piston engines, would have had an estimated speed of 470 km/h (292 mph), and a range of 1,550 km (963 miles). Span was 26.9 m (88 ft 7 in), length was 21.9 m (71 ft 6.5 in), height was 5.1 m (15 ft 8 in), and empty weight was 7,900 kg (17,416 lbs).

 

Specifications (BV 144 V1)

General characteristics

    Crew: 3

    Capacity: 18-23

    Length: 21.8 m (71 ft 6 in)

    Wingspan: 27 m (88 ft 7 in)

    Height: 4.75 m (15 ft 7 in)

    Wing area: 88 m2 (950 sq ft)

    Empty weight: 7,900 kg (17,417 lb)

    Max takeoff weight: 13,000 kg (28,660 lb)

    Powerplant: 2 × BMW 801A 14-cyl. two-row air-cooled radial piston engines, 1,147 kW (1,538 hp) each for take-off at sea level

    Propellers: 3-bladed variable pitch

Performance

    Maximum speed: 470 km/h (292 mph; 254 kn)

    Range: 1,550 km (963 mi; 837 nmi)

    Service ceiling: 9,100 m (29,856 ft)

Heinkel He 116

by Mitch on September 7, 2012 0 Comments

The Heinkel He 116 was designed in 1936 as a long-range transport/mail plane for Lufthansa. Eight units of the first version He 116 A were delivered in 1937. The aircraft was operated by a crew of three or four, it had a length of 14.3 m (46 ft 11 in), a span of 22 m (72 ft 2 in), a height of 3.3 m (10 ft 10 in), and an empty weight of 4,020 kg (8,826 lbs). Powered by four 240-hp Hirth HM 508 H inverted-V-8, air-cooled engines, it had a maximum speed of 325 km/h (202 mph), a service ceiling of 7,600 m (24,900 ft), and a range of 3,410 km (2,120 miles). The long-range potential of the He 116 suggested to the RLM that the airplane could have some military application. A militarized version, He 116B, was adapted with glazed nose, and six units entered Luftwaffe service in 1938. The aircraft proved disappointing however, and the Heinkel He 116Bs were confined to carrying out photographic and mapping work over Germany and German-occupied territories during World War II.

 

116R

V3 was removed from the line to be converted into a record-breaking prototype. The modifications included a larger 75.6 metre² (814 ft²) wing with a 25 metre (82 ft) span, and increased fuel tankage in the fuselage. The design did not need the same sort of altitude performance, so the HM 508H was installed in place of the C, with a slightly lower RPM and somewhat improved fuel economy, but only 240 hp (179 kW). The lower power and increased fuel made takeoffs difficult, so the plane, renamed the He 116R Rostock, was fitted with four RATO units. On its first test one of the rockets tore loose and hit the wing, requiring extensive repairs. After these were completed a second attempt was made on June 30, 1938, covering 9,942 km (6,178 mi) unrefueled, at an average speed of 214 km/h (133 mph).

116B

By this point the engine project had been cancelled outright, but additional orders continued with the 508s. V7 and V8 were modified for the long-range reconnaissance role with a "glass nose" similar to what would become common on most of the Luftwaffe's bomber designs. These were tested during 1938 with generally favourable results. Six additional aircraft based on the V7 pattern were then ordered, known as the He 116B-0, although they also received prototype numbers V9 through V14.

 

The He 116Bs were intended to operate at extremely long range, outside the range of enemy fighters, and therefore fit no defensive armament. All eight (V7 through V14) were issued to reconnaissance units prior to the war, but by that time the idea of a slow-moving unarmed plane providing any useful information seemed unlikely. Instead they were used over German territory providing mapping services.

 

Specifications (He 116A)

General characteristics

    Crew: 3 to 4

    Length: 13.70 m (44 ft 11 in)

    Wingspan: 22.0 m (72 ft 2 in)

    Height: 3.3 m (10 ft 10 in)

    Wing area: 62.9 m² (677 ft²)

    Empty weight: 4,050 kg (8,930 lb)

    Loaded weight: 7,130 kg (15,720 lb)

    Powerplant: 4× Hirth HM 508C air-cooled, inverted V8 engines, 182 kW (244 hp) each

Performance

    Maximum speed: 233 mph, 375 km/h (202 kt)

    Range: 2,170 mi, 3,500 km (1,900 nm)

    Service ceiling: 7,600 m (24,900 ft)

    Wing loading: 113 kg/m² (23 lb/ft²)

    Power/mass: 100 W/kg (0.06 hp/lb)

Blohm & Voss BV 142

by Mitch on September 7, 2012 0 Comments

Soon after the start of World War II, it was proposed to convert all four prototype BV 142 to long-range maritime patrol aircraft. The BV 142 V2, thus underwent a trial modification. It was fitted with an extended nose section with extensive glazing (like the Heinkel He 111 H-6), defensive armament (7.92 mm/.312 in MG 15 machine gun in nose, twin-beam position, ventral cupola, and a powered dorsal turret), a compartment for ordnance in the fuselage, and navigation and military radio equipment. The BV 142 V2, was redesignated BV 142 V2/U1 while V1 was similarly converted. Both were used operationally from late 1940 and were posted to the Luftwaffe's second surveillance Group. This unit was assigned to the operations staff of Luftflotte III in France. However, their performance was disappointing, and after only a few missions, they were withdrawn from service in 1942. The two other aircraft (V3 and V4) were used as transport aircraft for the occupation of Denmark and in the Norway campaign with the KGr.z.b.V. 105 (Special combat team) and could transport 30 fully equipped soldiers over 4,000 km (2,490 mi). The ultimate fate of V3 and V4 is unknown. It was later planned to use V1 and V2 to carry the Henschel GT 1200C guided torpedo, but the plan was scrapped.

#

The Blohm & Voss BV 142 was basically a slightly improved land version of the seaplane Blohm & Voss Ha 139. It was at first a civil development for transatlantic postal service, and was intended for the civilian commercial company Lufthansa. First flown in October 1938, the Bv 142 was completely metallic, and had a high horizontal stabilizer and double vertical tail, and low wing with a span of 29.53 m (96 ft 11 in). The fuselage was 20.45 m (67 ft 2 in) in length, 4.44 m (14 ft 6.5 in) in height, and had an approximately round cross section. The main landing gear was double-geared and fully retractable, as was the tail landing gear. The aircraft had a crew of five. It was powered by four 880-hp BMW 132H 9-cylinder radial piston engines, and had a maximum speed of 375 km/h (232 mph) and a range of 3,900 km (2,423 miles). Only four prototypes were built and tested by Lufthansa for use in the postal service. However, the outbreak of World War II prevented the further development of the civilian project. The existing types entered Luftwaffe service and were refurbished for sea-reconnaissance duty. The fuselage nose was extended and glazed, and five MG 15 machine guns were mounted in the nose, in the fuselage floor and on the fuselage upper surface. Four 100-kg bombs or eight 50-kg bombs could be carried. In 1940, the Bv 142s saw service in France, Denmark and Norway. However, performances were not satisfactory, and therefore the airplanes were withdrawn from active service by 1942. They returned to a transport role, with a capacity of thirty fully equipped soldiers over 4,000 km.

 

Specifications (BV 142 V2/U1)

General characteristics

    Crew: 6

    Length: 20.48 m (67 ft 2 in)

    Wingspan: 29.53 m (96 ft 11 in)

    Height: 4.44 m (14 ft 7 in)

    Wing area: 130 m2 (1,400 sq ft)

    Empty weight: 11,080 kg (24,427 lb)

    Max takeoff weight: 16,560 kg (36,509 lb)

    Powerplant: 4 × BMW 132H-1 9-cyl. air-cooled radial piston engines, 647 kW (868 hp) each for take-off

    Propellers: 3-bladed bladed variable pitch propeller

Performance

    Maximum speed: 373 km/h (232 mph; 201 kn) at sea level

    Cruising speed: 325 km/h (202 mph; 175 kn) at 2,000 m (6,562 ft)

    Range: 3,900 km (2,423 mi; 2,106 nmi) maximum with no bombload

    Service ceiling: 9,000 m (29,528 ft)

    Rate of climb: 6.67 m/s (1,313 ft/min)

Armament

    Guns: 5 × 7.92 mm (0.312 in) MG 15 machine guns

    Bombs: 4 × 100 kg (220.462 lb) bombs or 8 × 50 kg (110.231 lb) bombs

Aircraft Carrier: Graf Zeppelin (Schiffer Military History)

Aircraft Carrier: Graf Zeppelin (Schiffer Military History)

This book presents an account of the use and actions of the aircraft carrier Graf ...

Used starting at $6.94
New starting at $7.86

Go To Store More Info
German Aircraft of World War II

German Aircraft of World War II

BRAND NEW!!! Qualifies for FREE SHIPPING! Over 60,000 happy customers, 100% GUARANTEED!!!

Used starting at $2.18
New starting at $13.98

Go To Store More Info
German Aircraft Landing Gear: A Detailed Study of German World War II Combat Aircraft

German Aircraft Landing Gear: A Detailed Study of German World War II Combat Aircraft

Detailed book explores the landing gear systems of World War II German combat aircraft.

Used starting at $26.00
New starting at $29.01

Go To Store More Info
German Gliders in World War II:  Luftwaffe Gliders and their Powered Variants

German Gliders in World War II: Luftwaffe Gliders and their Powered Variants

"DFS 230 -- Go 242 -- Go 244 -- Go 345 -- Ka 430 -- Me 321 -- Ju 322 -- Me 323."

Used starting at $126.49
New starting at $52.17

Go To Store More Info
Foreign Planes in the Service of the Luftwaffe

Foreign Planes in the Service of the Luftwaffe

No airforce in the Second World War would make more use of captured planes than the ...

Go To Store More Info
The Luftwaffe: 1933-45: Strategy for Defeat (Brassey's Commemorative Series, WWII)

The Luftwaffe: 1933-45: Strategy for Defeat (Brassey's Commemorative Series, WWII)

This penetrating work explains the successes and failures of the German air force in ...

Used starting at $3.34
New starting at $22.95

Go To Store More Info
X-Planes: German Luftwaffe Prototypes 1930-1945

X-Planes: German Luftwaffe Prototypes 1930-1945

Renowned German aviation specialist Manfred Griehl has collected a unique and valuable ...

Go To Store More Info
Wings of the Luftwaffe: Flying the Captured German Aircraft of World War II

Wings of the Luftwaffe: Flying the Captured German Aircraft of World War II

During more than two decades of uninterrupted flying Eric Winkle Brown enjoyed the most ...

Used starting at $35.99
New starting at $36.00

Go To Store More Info
BADER'S LAST FIGHT: An In-Depth Investigation of a Great WWII Mystery

BADER'S LAST FIGHT: An In-Depth Investigation of a Great WWII Mystery

On 9th August 1941 one of the greatest icons of the Second World War, Douglas Bader, was ...

Used starting at $3.99
New starting at $17.50

Go To Store More Info
WWII Aircraft: Modeling, Detailing, Painting Weathering and Building Dioramas (Volume 1)

WWII Aircraft: Modeling, Detailing, Painting Weathering and Building Dioramas (Volume 1)

Soft cover 48 pages 125 full color photographs This volume initiated a new modeling ...

New starting at $12.95

Go To Store More Info
Search

Post archives

No blog archives

Post categories

No blog categories

Eastern Front rarities Ar 232, He 177, Me 321 - daily Ebay photo find

click to view large and currently on offer hereHe 177 of KG 1Ar 232 A-02 W.Nr. 100004 "VD+YB" , ...

Aufklärungsstaffel See/88 - AS./88 Legion Condor - Nationalist Ju 52 3m (W) - Totenkopf emblem - daily Ebay photo find

Along with the first variants of the Stuka to fly combat sorties, one of the rarest Luftwaffe types ...

Bf 109 G-6/R6 I./JG 300 wilde Sau

for those blog visitors who don't know Facebook, here are some JG 300 finds 're-posted' from the FB ...

NJG 1 Venlo Nachtjagd photo album - Daily Ebay photo find

On offer at this link, a NJG photo album featuring Ordensverleihungen (award ceremonies - award of ...

JG 51 Mölders Messerschmitt Bf 109 - Daily Ebay photo find

http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=301144643722&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:GB:1120

more unknown Fw 190s on Facebook - JG 1, JG 4, JG 5, JG 54, JG 2

There are many Luftwaffe groups on Facebook, which I tend to check out daily. There are a number of ...

Rudi Dassow ZG 26 Me 410 - daily Ebay photo find

Nice selection of rare pics of leading Zerstörer ace Lt. Rudi Dassow seen here at the conclusion of ...

Lt. Walter Bohatsch II./ JG 3 - Bf 109 G-5

 Bf 109 G-5 W.Nr. 26 09x "Schwarze 6" flown by Lt. Walter Bohatsch (seen below, right, click to ...

unknown emblem on crash-landed Fw 190

.. courtesy of Jan Zdiarsky  via Günther Landgraf, are these two pictures (from one photo) showing ...

German Aircraft of World War II

German Aircraft of World War II

BRAND NEW!!! Qualifies for FREE SHIPPING! Over 60,000 happy customers, 100% GUARANTEED!!!

Used starting at $2.18
New starting at $13.98

Go To Store More Info
German Aircraft Cockpits 1911-1970:

German Aircraft Cockpits 1911-1970:

Using the cockpits of approximately sixty military and civil aircraft as examples, this ...

Used starting at $58.10
New starting at $62.76

Go To Store More Info
Aviatik Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation Series) (Volume 10)

Aviatik Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation Series) (Volume 10)

This book describes and illustrates the development of Aviatik aircraft in WWI with text, ...

New starting at $21.67

Go To Store More Info
German Aircraft Landing Gear: A Detailed Study of German World War II Combat Aircraft

German Aircraft Landing Gear: A Detailed Study of German World War II Combat Aircraft

Detailed book explores the landing gear systems of World War II German combat aircraft.

Used starting at $26.00
New starting at $29.01

Go To Store More Info
German Aircraft in Russian and Soviet Service, 1914-1951 (Schiffer Military History) (v. 1)

German Aircraft in Russian and Soviet Service, 1914-1951 (Schiffer Military History) (v. 1)

The two books, by authors Andrei Alexandrov and Genadi Petrov, illustrated with many ...

Used starting at $27.67
New starting at $32.55

Go To Store More Info
The German Aces Speak II: World War II Through the Eyes of Four More of the Luftwaffe's Most Important Commanders

The German Aces Speak II: World War II Through the Eyes of Four More of the Luftwaffe's Most Important Commanders

The much-anticipated sequel to The German Aces Speak gives voice to four more of WWII’s ...

Used starting at $17.88
New starting at $17.40

Go To Store More Info
Aircraft Carrier: Graf Zeppelin (Schiffer Military History)

Aircraft Carrier: Graf Zeppelin (Schiffer Military History)

This book presents an account of the use and actions of the aircraft carrier Graf ...

Used starting at $6.94
New starting at $7.86

Go To Store More Info
German Aircraft of the Second World War

German Aircraft of the Second World War

Illustrated throughout, this is a complete historical record of over 600 aircraft, ...

Used starting at $13.05
New starting at $44.95

Go To Store More Info
German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

Much has been written about the British aircraft of World War One, but little has ...

Used starting at $14.19
New starting at $29.95

Go To Store More Info
Wings of the Luftwaffe: Flying the Captured German Aircraft of World War II

Wings of the Luftwaffe: Flying the Captured German Aircraft of World War II

During more than two decades of uninterrupted flying Eric Winkle Brown enjoyed the most ...

Used starting at $35.99
New starting at $36.00

Go To Store More Info
Search